How to Write Effective Emails

How to Write Effective Emails


We use email to connect with business partners, potential clients, colleagues and everyone else whom we need to contact. And vice versa. This means every person who deals with emails gets lots of messages and this leaves less quality time per email to read and act. MailTime is an app that makes email conversations look like text messages for easier communication. Heatherm Huang, the co-founder of MailTime, advises what rules to follow when writing an email in to make sure it will be read and understood by its recipient.

  1. Keep it short. The recipients of your emails have to read lots of emails through the day so sometimes they do that on the go or while multitasking. So the best way for them to get what you want to tell them is to get a short straightforward email. In survey done by MailTime, it is concluded that 76% of employees dislike emails longer than three paragraphs and 20% have said that they don’t read emails longer than one paragraph.
  1. Answer promptly. Time is precious so we should act on emails as quickly as possible. Among MailTime customers, 56% have stated that they try to respond to an email within 4 hours and Huang says “Business moves quickly and so should your emails.”
  1. Think before you CC. You should think twice before writing lots of names as recipients. Again we come to the problem with the inbox overload so make sure to send the email only to the people it is relevant to. Also, if you receive an email and see there are other receivers, make sure when you reply the email that you reply only to the people you have to.
  1. Match your greetings to your recipient’s’ style. How should you start and how should you send an email? The only recipe is that you should make sure your greetings and signature are relevant to the recipient. In a more formal situation you may have to address the recipient by his last name and in other cases you may simply start with “Hey!”. The same goes for the signatures. You can finish an email with “Sincerely”, “Best” or nothing at all based on the receiver.
  1. Manage your emotions. Make sure you never send an email out of anger.  If there is time, Huang advises to write the message first as a draft and then to reread it later with a clear head.
  1. Be human. Try to personalize the emails so that they don’t sound like an auto-response emails with lots of cliches. You can even use emoticons or GIFs where this is appropriate.

Source: http://www.inc.com/minda-zetlin/the-simple-mistake-that-makes-1-in-5-people-stop-reading-your-email.html